Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
This article is for general information purposes only and is not intended as specific tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for advice relevant to your situation. As 1099 forms from U.S. banks and brokerages start to roll in, many Americans living overseas are collecting the various documents needed to file their 2016 U.S. taxes. Since there's a number of sometimes obscure U.S. tax forms that U.S. citizens living overseas are required to file, we've...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
If you have lived in Asia for a while, chances are good that either you or someone you know has been offered the chance to purchase a life insurance savings scheme. Sold by independent financial advisors, armies of commissioned insurance agents, bank branches, and other financial institutions, insurance-linked savings and investment schemes seem like the Herbalife of finance. Many local insurance products are heavily marketed by “agents” of varying degrees of training and professionalism who...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
This article originally appeared in the February 2017 International Investment magazine under the title “Taxes Your American Clients Need to Know About Before Investing Offshore” and has been shared with permission. With the advent of the US Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), most offshore financial intermediaries and expat Americans at last realise, if they didn’t before, that trying to avoid US tax by investing offshore doesn’t work. These days, American citizens and Green Card...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
Does it make sense for expatriates to prepay a mortgage loan? With very low mortgage rates in many parts of the world, along with plenty of opportunities for refinancing, this may seem like a strange question. For expats, however, the answer depends on the circumstances. Expats tend to live and own properties all over the world, and not all markets offer the ultra-low rates currently found in developed countries such as the U.S. In Thailand...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
One of the more confusing issues for many expats residing overseas is managing their currency exposure. If you're an American working in Vietnam and plan to retire in Thailand, should you be investing in the U.S. dollar (USD), the Vietnamese dong (VND), or the Thai baht (THB), or does it matter? Compounding the problem, many expats don't know what their actual currency exposure really is. Is it the currency stated on your brokerage statement, the...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
Many of us expats look forward to a new year with a renewed desire to make positive changes in our lives. From a financial standpoint, improving our circumstances largely requires instilling good habits, being consistent, getting started early, and possessing a basic understanding of finance and investing concepts. To help you enjoy a more prosperous new year, here are 12 financial New Year's resolutions. Start at the beginning and aim to knock off at least...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
Someone once said that nothing in life is free, and that definitely applies to investment advice. You may not realize it, and it may not be transparent, but when expats receive third-party investment advice they pay for it in one way or the other. Unfortunately, a bewildering array of packaging and clever marketing efforts can disguise the issue and make it difficult to tell just how much and exactly what the true costs are. To...
This article originally appeared in the American Chamber of Commerce of Thailand (AMCHAM)’s T-AB Magazine 5/2016 and has been shared with permission. For many employed expats in Thailand, Thai Long-Term Equity Funds (LTFs) and Retirement Mutual Funds (RMFs) can provide worthwhile Thai tax benefits. This article discusses the merits of both types of investments, and highlights an important 2016 change to the LTF holding period. For a period of time U.S. citizens were unable to...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
As you look for a holiday gift for your favorite expat, or perhaps just for some interesting reading for yourself over the holidays, have a look through our annual list of highly rated books from 2016, especially selected with the expat reader in mind. All can be easily purchased on the internet, and while some are more serious, some are just for fun. For those expats who may live far away, most of these titles...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
It's not news that we're facing a retirement crisis. According to a retirement security report by the U.S. Government Accountability Agency, "About half of (U.S.) households age 55 and older have no retirement savings (such as in a 401(k) plan or an IRA)…Many older households without retirement savings have few other resources, such as a defined benefit (DB) plan or nonretirement savings, to draw on in retirement." A number of structural issues—a shift away from...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
As a survey from earlier this year showed, one of the top concerns expats have is how they will finance retirement. We all know that saving for retirement is challenging—just the sheer amount of money required is a barrier for many. Saving for the future goes against human nature. Behavioral economic studies suggest that at a basic level, we're more strongly motivated by short-term concerns than long-term possibilities. We're also more likely to avoid pain...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
The Wall Street Journal invited Creveling & Creveling to be part of a panel of experts for personal finance on its WSJ Expat site. The following article originally appeared on the WSJ site and has been shared with permission: Individual retirement accounts can be a great tool for those saving for retirement. The combination of tax-deductible contributions and tax deferral often allows funds to compound faster than in a taxable account. But the problem for...