Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
Expat Americans married to foreign spouses and who have kids who one day plan to attend college face special challenges (and opportunities) when saving for higher education. One challenge is simply the costs involved. In the U.S., university tuitions have been increasing at above-average inflation rates for years. Although one option to help cut the cost may be to send your kids to a non-U.S. school, universities outside the U.S. are also not as affordable...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
Nearly every expat who has lived outside their home country for a significant length of time will consider buying a home overseas. This may not be strictly a financial decision. Often, expats are looking to recapture a sense of stability and permanence or to forge a connection with the local community. Sometimes, we’re also hoping to participate in what appears to be a rapidly appreciating property market. In many cases, owning a home overseas can...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
By Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA Living overseas can be filled with adventure, but it can also add complexity to your financial affairs. Even if you’re assisted by your company’s HR department, the complexity can make day-to-day management and long-term financial planning a time-consuming and overwhelming burden. Below are tips to help simplify the management of your finances, save time, and remove stress so that you can focus on the more enjoyable aspects...
By Peggy Creveling, CFA and Chad Creveling, CFA This article is for general information purposes only and is not intended as specific tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for advice relevant to your situation. If you're an American working overseas who's a contractor, sole proprietor, or small business owner, you may think that there are few U.S. tax-advantaged choices available to help you save for retirement. Those expats not working for U.S. firms are...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
This article is for general information purposes only and is not intended as specific tax advice. Please consult your tax advisor for advice relevant to your situation. If you're an American expat with kids who one day plan to attend college or university, you've probably read or heard about how quickly the cost of higher education has been rising. Recent figures bear this out; according to the latest survey by The College Board, the average...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
The Chartered Financial Analyst® designation is one of the most respected accreditations in the investment and wealth advisory industries. It is recognized by employers, investment professionals, and investors around the world as the definitive standard by which to measure serious investment professionals. With the first designations awarded in 1963, the CFA Institute now has more than 135,000 charterholders working in over 150 countries and territories across the globe. To become a CFA charterholder, individuals must...
When it comes to building an investment portfolio, one of the first decisions many expats need to make is selecting an appropriate global custodian. A custodian is a financial institution such as a brokerage, asset management company or bank where you can hold your investment assets and buy and sell various global investment products. It may also provide various banking facilities, such as savings accounts, checking facilities, debit cards and other services. There are a...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
Investors generally claim they value consistent portfolio returns, but in practice often act in ways that increase both volatility and portfolio risk. Why are consistent portfolio returns important? Because strategies that consistently compound modest returns outperform investment strategies that generate more variable returns but also generate the occasional home run. A more subtle reason is that consistent performance makes it psychologically easier for investors to stick with their investment strategies over the long run. Slow...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
Once you stop earning a salary, the focus quickly turns to how you will generate an income to fund your retirement. If you're lucky, you have one of those rare corporate or government pensions. Most of us, however, are going to have to rely on social security or national pensions and whatever investment savings we have to fund retirement. For many expats who have not paid into national pensions schemes or may not be eligible...
Chad Creveling, CFA and Peggy Creveling, CFA |
One of the first financial questions foreigners planning to move to Thailand often have is how to transfer money in and out of the country. To help expats who are new to Thailand decide on which method suits their situation, we’ve described a few of the options below: Bank Wire Transfers—Best Way to Move Large Sums: If you plan to transfer a sizable amount of money between two bank accounts and you need a record...
The Wall Street Journal invited Creveling & Creveling to be part of a panel of experts for personal finance on its WSJ Expat site. The following article originally appeared on the WSJ site and has been shared with permission: As Americans living overseas know, U.S. citizens and green-card holders must pay U.S. tax on their worldwide income, no matter where they live or are considered tax residents. In recent years, the introduction of the Foreign...
Choosing an offshore financial advisor carefully is as important as choosing a doctor or lawyer. You'll want to find someone who is competent and trustworthy, and who works in your best interest. To help you find the financial advisor who may be right for you (as well as to protect you from those who could do harm), we've put together some characteristics to look for in choosing a cross-border financial planner: Transparency and full disclosure...